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What accommodations should employers make for disabled employees?

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If you have a disability, your employer must follow the Americans with Disabilities Act. This means that he or she cannot treat you differently or poorly because you have a disability.

In addition, according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, your employer must provide accommodations. The law applies to all aspects of employment, including promotions, job assignments, pay and fringe benefits.

What constitutes a disability?

Medical conditions do not necessarily constitute as disabilities on their own. First, you do have to have the qualifications for your position and second, you must have a disability defined by law.

If you have a disability that causes a mental or physical impairment that lasts for six months or less, if you have history of disability or if you have a condition that limits your lifestyle, you may qualify. Limitations to your lifestyle include inability to perform a major bodily function any other condition that affects your daily life.

If you have a loved one with a disability and provide care, the anti-discrimination laws do not apply, but you may qualify under the Family Medical Leave Act.

What accommodations do employers have to make?

Your employer must make reasonable accommodations. For instance, an employer may have to make the business wheelchair accessible or supply a reader or interpreter for those who have seeing or hearing impairments.

The law does not require your employer to provide accommodations that would result in a significant expense. An employer’s financial resources, size and other needs are critical to the decision. If there are several different types of accommodations that could work for your disability, the employer can decide what type of accommodation to provide.